Dont Forget the Vets

One of the most important groups to me and a big improv force is the veteran team of Improv Nation at SFSU.  Sure the team itself is relatively contained to SF State but it creates its own bubble of improv and improves steadily.

 

‘But what is the veteran team?’ you may ask.  Well improv nation has two groups essentially. One is the group as a whole, and this includes everyone from newbies who have just joined to Travis Northup who started the group three years ago.  The next level past then is a sub-group within improv nation as a whole: the veteran team.

 

There are two base requirements to be on the veteran team of Improv Nation

1. You must have been in at least one of improv nation’s shows

2. You must have been in the organization for at least a year

 

Anyone who fits these qualifications is then interviewed by the already existing veteran team who create a special and creepy secret interview process.  Each applicant is judged by the vet team on a rubric testing several areas of skill on a scale of 1-10. Commitment/attitude to Improv nation is important because veteran team requires a committed and dedicated group to work together with good attitudes. Area of expertise (is the applicant clear whether their improv specialty is characters, narrative, or space work) is important and is judged because a more focused individual is more valuable to a team than someone who hasn’t defined themselves. The rubric also judges attendance because frankly if you don’t show up to practices then how can the team trust you to show up consistently to a different night of practices?

 

The veteran team differs from the normal team in the aspects of what type of improv it does. The Improv Nation veteran team does more complicated forms of improv such as long form improv. A Long-form improv scene for the veteran team usually comes out to about one hour. It does different styles of long form such as fables, superhero stories, and dramatic improv.

 

Two nights a week of improv at the least for veterans, they have to be dedicated and learn to work together to gel with each others’ styles of improv acting. They have to learn to make each other look good.

Veterans do a two-hour show after every normal improv show, making the entire process four hours long, and runs a price of $2.

Every spring the veteran team chooses a spring project which focuses their veteran shows into a specific theme or style of long form.  It could be consistent characters seen in every show, or every show being a different fairy tale.

Once on the Veteran team the member stays with them until they graduate or leave the school or group. If a member does not make the veteran team they may try to reapply the next year for a spot.

 

 

Rejection never gets you anywhere in improv or life

For those of you who have ever done improv there is nothing more disheartening then throwing out an idea and having someone squash it and instead follow their own ideas. As a matter of fact, even those who don’t do improv know this feeling because it is both universal and prevalent in our everyday encounters. We all know that one person who just says “no” for the hell of it, and it’s enough to take the wind out of anyone’s sails.

Improv knows that rejections, while they may be funny sometimes, are bad moves and stop scene momentum in a heartbeat.  That is why the ‘Yes and’ rule was invented, which states that an improviser should take the suggestion of their team member and say yes, but not only say yes but instead also add something to the conversation to give it direction and momentum. Sure there are the improv acting aspects of the rule, but one thing i want to impart on you my readers is that it definitely has real life applications.

As said it is the “Yes and” rule and not just the ‘yes’ rule.  It is easier when someone agrees with you in comparison to a blatant no, but without the other person adding anything all the pressure is put on you. In some cases people prefer the position of power and take advantage of ”yes men,” but to make a true team effort all the pieces should be making equal and commendable efforts to help make each person’s job easier.

There are articles and books that speak directly to the idea of “yes” and how it can improve life. I personally find a lot of them cheesy but in the end there is some legitimacy behind the whole idea. Now I’m not an inspirational speaker but i can tell you one or two things.

No, in its essence, is a stopping word, it prevents progress, whereas yes shows an openness to new ideas and a possibility for new things.  Being closed-minded in an improv scene or real-life capacity creates stagnancy and awkwardness. When you shut out the ideas of others you leave yourself no safety net if your personal effort isn’t enough.

Improv is a team sport. As funny as you may be, improv with one person will never be the same as seeing a group work harmoniously together on the fly of their pants.  That is why improv isn’t always about being funny; it’s about receiving ideas from others, agreeing with them completely, and then throwing an extra gift to add to the ideas on the table, etc.

In business teamwork is not unheard of, and the ability to be open to new ideas and agree with the inclinations of others is a useful skill. Taking a boss’request and getting it done, but also adding extra value to the task is a sure way to stand out and be unique.

There are plenty of improv skills that translate to real life and this is one of the key ones. To summarize:

1. Saying yes to new things and ideas in improv and real life creates new opportunities or can give a scene direction

2. No, is a universally stopping word and prevents progress on stage and in life, rather than bolstering it.

3. Don’t just say yes, yes and allows you to do more than just support the ideas of others. It allows you to add to the pool of ideas, while also taking in others’ suggestions.

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