Dont Forget the Vets

One of the most important groups to me and a big improv force is the veteran team of Improv Nation at SFSU.  Sure the team itself is relatively contained to SF State but it creates its own bubble of improv and improves steadily.

 

‘But what is the veteran team?’ you may ask.  Well improv nation has two groups essentially. One is the group as a whole, and this includes everyone from newbies who have just joined to Travis Northup who started the group three years ago.  The next level past then is a sub-group within improv nation as a whole: the veteran team.

 

There are two base requirements to be on the veteran team of Improv Nation

1. You must have been in at least one of improv nation’s shows

2. You must have been in the organization for at least a year

 

Anyone who fits these qualifications is then interviewed by the already existing veteran team who create a special and creepy secret interview process.  Each applicant is judged by the vet team on a rubric testing several areas of skill on a scale of 1-10. Commitment/attitude to Improv nation is important because veteran team requires a committed and dedicated group to work together with good attitudes. Area of expertise (is the applicant clear whether their improv specialty is characters, narrative, or space work) is important and is judged because a more focused individual is more valuable to a team than someone who hasn’t defined themselves. The rubric also judges attendance because frankly if you don’t show up to practices then how can the team trust you to show up consistently to a different night of practices?

 

The veteran team differs from the normal team in the aspects of what type of improv it does. The Improv Nation veteran team does more complicated forms of improv such as long form improv. A Long-form improv scene for the veteran team usually comes out to about one hour. It does different styles of long form such as fables, superhero stories, and dramatic improv.

 

Two nights a week of improv at the least for veterans, they have to be dedicated and learn to work together to gel with each others’ styles of improv acting. They have to learn to make each other look good.

Veterans do a two-hour show after every normal improv show, making the entire process four hours long, and runs a price of $2.

Every spring the veteran team chooses a spring project which focuses their veteran shows into a specific theme or style of long form.  It could be consistent characters seen in every show, or every show being a different fairy tale.

Once on the Veteran team the member stays with them until they graduate or leave the school or group. If a member does not make the veteran team they may try to reapply the next year for a spot.

 

 

Improv Nation a Brand New Sensation

Well let me honest, maybe not completely a brand new sensation, but in proportion to the history of improv, the group Improv Nation is comparatively a baby among giants.

When I first came to San Francisco State two years ago I hadn’t done much improv in my life. As far as experience I had only dabbled slightly within some high school drama classes and started a quickly unsuccessful lunchtime group that sort of was into Improv.

I’ve done theater for a long time, probably ever since I was a little kid (In fact I think my first ever dramatic work was when I was merely a baby playing baby Squanto… I had no lines.) I did drama through middle school and then all the way through high school, doing every play that Monterey High had to offer me.

But when I came to SF State I knew that I was going to have a hard time doing theater, at least as I knew it, because of the extended amounts of time I would spend on journalism.

Luckily one day in my first week of college, as I was walking into a Malcolm X Plaza crowded with groups like the Young Democrats and PEACH when I saw a short man in a Captain America costume yelling at the crowd about something.

Being the curious fellow that I am and a person with a penchant for the dramatic, I made my way to the table and found out that they represented “Improv Nation.”

That was the start of a beautiful friendship. I will get more into Improv Nation, my experiences, and other goodies in future posts, but I want to introduce you all to the club that changed my life and idea of drama.

Travis Northup, past ASI representative and SF State student, started Improv Nation three years ago when he was a freshman. He found out there was no improv club on campus and so he took it upon himself to get with LEAD and founded what is known today as Improv Nation.

The club has grown in size tremendously, now sporting almost 100 regular members who meet every Monday night from 6-9 in the Humanities building (feel free to contact me or any member of Improv Nation for room number.)  Improv Nation has it’s own format of competitive short form improv and hosts 8 shows a year which are 2$.

Improv Nation also has a veteran team of improvisers who have been in the club for at least a year, been in a show, and have been approved by the present veteran team before them. The vet team does an extra show after every short form show from 8-10, in which they do more complicated and advanced forms of improv like long form (improv that does longer scenes, sometimes more than an hour.)

Anyone can join Improv Nation and be involved; nobody is rejected because of his or her skill level or attendance. Everyone’s involvement is up to his or her own will (although you’re more likely to get in a show eventually if you attend practices.)

Most everyone knows of Improv Nation on campus, although probably as ‘those strange kids that dress in costumes and bother me while I’m in the quad.’ Improv Nation is one of the most fun clubs available on the SF State campus. Are there any other clubs that will freeze in place or dance in the rain for the amusement of students?

SF State Journalism has had its taste of Improv Nation, doing a story on it almost every semester, because the things it does are so outrageous.  Improv Nation does really big events on campus such as an annual zombie apocalypse, along with a 24-hour improv marathon, the first 24-hour event on campus, which will be repeated later this semester.

It’s not for everyone, and that’s the truth. Some people don’t have fun being silly and putting themselves out there, but there is definitely success stories of the club. I’ve met some of my best friends through my involvement with Improv Nation and there’s something to be said about letting go of your inhibitions and being a little wacky.

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